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Acre - Museums
 
 
The Okashi Musem
Next to the Knights’ Halls of Old Acre there is a building with cruciform domes, dating from the Ottoman Period. A museum operates in the building, with temporary exhibits of Israeli art alongside a permanent exhibit of the works of the late Avshalom Okashi. This artist was one of the lynchpins of the New Horizons, a group of artists that was organized in Israel after the War of Independence. Okashi spent most of his life in Acre, where he set up his workshop, which, after his death, became the Okashi Museum. The subjects of his early works are rooted in the nature and human and spiritual reality of Israel and are drawn from Biblical texts.
 
 
Hama al-Basha (The Turkish Bath)
Adorned with marble floors and imported ceramic tiles, the elegant building of Hama al-Bash, operates as a unique museum.  This beautifully preserved Turkish bath was built by El-Jazar in the year 1795 and touring through this museum is very much like a trip back in time to the Turkish Empire of the 18th and 19th centuries.
 
The bathhouse has an entry room that serves as a dressing room, with a marble fountain in the center. A corridor leads from the entry room to a series of hot rooms, the last of which is a hexagonal steam room, with a domed roof supported by four marble columns, with four rooms for individual use, one at each corner.
 
 
The Story of the Last Bath Attendant – A live Performance at Hamam al-Basha
The Al Basha Hammam Theater takes you on a dramatic experience. The lives of a typical family of bath attendants introduce you to the story of Acre from the time the Turkish Baths were built at the end of the 18th century by Jazzar Pasha..
 
History takes on an especially luscious dimension when seen through the eyes of the bath attendant, because the Turkish Baths were much more than a religious purification house. The Baths served as a social center where people met for rest, entertainment and banquets.
 
The Acre Turkish Baths, one of the most beautiful and fascinating sites in the Old City, comes to life through an imaginary play based on a line of bath attendants that tell the history of Acre during the Ottoman Period.
 
*Info courtesy of akko.org 


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